• What is a Developed Economy?

    Welcome to the Investors Trading Academy talking glossary of financial terms and events. Our word of the day is “Developed Economy” A developed economy defines a nation with a healthy per capita income and low birth rate. Its citizens enjoy a high standard of living, educational opportunities, and access to adequate health care. Also called an industrialized country, a developed economy is measured by a country’s gross domestic product, which typically is well diversified. Most countries with a developed economy export goods worldwide. These regions’ banking, financial, and political systems typically remain stable and contribute to growth and productivity. People living in a developed economy generally live longer because of access to health care and proper nutrition. They tend to be ski...

    published: 28 Jul 2015
  • Productivity and Growth: Crash Course Economics #6

    Why are some countries rich? Why are some countries poor? In the end it comes down to Productivity. This week on Crash Course Econ, Adriene and Jacob investigate just why some economies are more productive than others, and what happens when an economy is mor productive. We'll look at how things like per capita GDP translate to the lifestyle of normal people. And, there's a mystery. Crash Course is on Patreon! You can support us directly by signing up at http://www.patreon.com/crashcourse Thanks to the following Patrons for their generous monthly contributions that help keep Crash Course free for everyone forever: Mark, Jan Schmid, Simun Niclasen, Robert Kunz, Daniel Baulig, Jason A Saslow, Eric Kitchen, Christian, Beatrice Jin, Anna-Ester Volozh, Eric Knight, Elliot Beter, Jeffrey Thomp...

    published: 28 Aug 2015
  • Outlook of developed economies

    Head of Investment from Nomura Asset Management Malaysia, Leslie Yap expects developed economies to grow.

    published: 05 Sep 2015
  • Full Potential Refining in Developed Economies

    Pedro Caruso, a partner in the Oil & Gas practice, offers a structured plan that can help refiners overcome compressed margins and eventually reap the benefits of the industry's structural shift. Read the Bain Brief: http://www.bain.com/publications/articles/full-potential-oil-refining-in-a-challenging-environment.aspx More on Pedro Caruso: http://www.bain.com/about/people-and-values/our-team/profiles/pedro-caruso.aspx

    published: 27 Oct 2016
  • Puzzle of Growth: Rich Countries and Poor Countries

    Throughout this section of the course, we’ve been trying to solve a complicated economic puzzle—why are some countries rich and others poor? There are various factors at play, interacting in a dynamic, and changing environment. And the final answer to the puzzle differs depending on the perspective you're looking from. In this video, you'll examine different pieces of the wealth puzzle, and learn about how they fit. The first piece of the puzzle, is about productivity. You'll learn how physical capital, human capital, technological knowledge, and entrepreneurs all fit together to spur higher productivity in a population. From this perspective, you'll see economic growth as a function of a country's factors of production. You’ll also learn what investments can be made to improve and inc...

    published: 16 Feb 2016
  • Why Some Countries Are Poor and Others Rich

    The reason why some countries are rich and others poor depends on many things, including the quality of their institutions, the culture they have, the natural resources they find and what latitude they're on. If you like our films, take a look at our shop (we ship worldwide): https://goo.gl/dXpOl4 We have, unusually, had to disable comments because of the number of people writing to tell us that we have forgotten about colonialism. We are very aware of colonialism but didn't, on this occasion, give this factor a central role. FURTHER READING You can read more on CAPITALISM, SELF, RELATIONSHIPS and many other topics on our blog TheBookofLife.org at this link: https://goo.gl/IG0HRZ MORE SCHOOL OF LIFE Our website has classes, articles and products to help you think and grow: htt...

    published: 24 Nov 2014
  • Dambisa Moyo: Is China the new idol for emerging economies?

    The developed world holds up the ideals of capitalism, democracy and political rights for all. Those in emerging markets often don't have that luxury. In this powerful talk, economist Dambisa Moyo makes the case that the west can't afford to rest on its laurels and imagine others will blindly follow. Instead, a different model, embodied by China, is increasingly appealing. A call for open-minded political and economic cooperation in the name of transforming the world. TEDTalks is a daily video podcast of the best talks and performances from the TED Conference, where the world's leading thinkers and doers give the talk of their lives in 18 minutes (or less). Look for talks on Technology, Entertainment and Design -- plus science, business, global issues, the arts and much more. Find closed ...

    published: 11 Nov 2013
  • How China became the world's second largest economy

    More than 500 million people have been lifted out of poverty since China's economic reforms began in 1978.

    published: 06 Oct 2015
  • WESP 2013 Regional Economic Outlook Developed Economies

    Хотите выгодно инвестировать деньги? Тогда заходите на мой блог: http://invest-system-thuong.blogspot.com/

    published: 17 Jan 2013
  • Developed Countries VS. Developing Countries

    None-- Created using PowToon -- Free sign up at http://www.powtoon.com/ . Make your own animated videos and animated presentations for free. PowToon is a free tool that allows you to develop cool animated clips and animated presentations for your website, office meeting, sales pitch, nonprofit fundraiser, product launch, video resume, or anything else you could use an animated explainer video. PowToon's animation templates help you create animated presentations and animated explainer videos from scratch. Anyone can produce awesome animations quickly with PowToon, without the cost or hassle other professional animation services require.

    published: 08 Apr 2014
  • Largest Economies in the World 2016 GDP (PPP) | IMF

    Top 15 countries by GDP PPP in the world.

    published: 08 May 2015
  • Economic Development Series: Common Characteristics of Developing Countries

    Hey Everyone, This is video 4 of 6 videos in “The Economic Development Series”. Watch the entire series right here: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLNI2Up0JUWkEhlr-c4dpa1xqQf-Sq2BXv The List! Here is the “The List” for “The Economic Development Series”: For an explanation of the logic of “The Lists” click here: https://youtu.be/dE0fbsgXlFE What is economic development? Sources of economic growth 1. Natural factors 2. Human capital factors 3. Physical capital and technological factors 4. Institutional factors Does economic growth lead to economic development? 1. Higher incomes 2. Improved economic indicators of welfare 3. Higher government revenues 4. Creation of inequality 5. Negative externalities and lack of sustainability Common characteristics of developing countries 1. L...

    published: 21 Feb 2016
  • Developed Economies Still Matter

    With the world's focus on emerging economies, it's easy to think developed economies offer no growth potential for businesses. In this video, Sarah Boumphrey, Head of Countries of Consumers Research at Euromonitor International, discusses the advantages developed economies hold over emerging economies, including friendlier business environments, less corruption and higher penetration of technology.

    published: 13 Aug 2013
  • Why Singapore became an economic success

    When it started life as an independent, separate country in 1965, Singapore’s prospects did not look good. Tiny and underdeveloped, it had no natural resources and a population of relatively recent immigrants with little shared history. The country’s first prime minister, the late Lee Kuan Yew is credited with transforming it. He called one volume of his memoirs, “From Third World to First”. Why did Singapore become an economic success? First, its strategic location and natural harbour helped. It is at the mouth of the Malacca Strait, through which perhaps 40% of world maritime trade passes. It was an important trading post in the 14th century, and again from the 19th, when British diplomat Sir Stamford Raffles founded the modern city. Now it is at the heart of one of the world’s most...

    published: 26 Mar 2015
  • Carbon Sequestration in Developed Economies

    How can CO2 be captured?

    published: 14 Oct 2016
What is a Developed Economy?

What is a Developed Economy?

  • Order:
  • Duration: 1:04
  • Updated: 28 Jul 2015
  • views: 278
videos
Welcome to the Investors Trading Academy talking glossary of financial terms and events. Our word of the day is “Developed Economy” A developed economy defines a nation with a healthy per capita income and low birth rate. Its citizens enjoy a high standard of living, educational opportunities, and access to adequate health care. Also called an industrialized country, a developed economy is measured by a country’s gross domestic product, which typically is well diversified. Most countries with a developed economy export goods worldwide. These regions’ banking, financial, and political systems typically remain stable and contribute to growth and productivity. People living in a developed economy generally live longer because of access to health care and proper nutrition. They tend to be skilled and educated workers who earn decent salaries. The most well-known current examples of developed countries include the United States, Canada and most of western Europe, including England and France. By Barry Norman, Investors Trading Academy
https://wn.com/What_Is_A_Developed_Economy
Productivity and Growth: Crash Course Economics #6

Productivity and Growth: Crash Course Economics #6

  • Order:
  • Duration: 8:51
  • Updated: 28 Aug 2015
  • views: 360077
videos
Why are some countries rich? Why are some countries poor? In the end it comes down to Productivity. This week on Crash Course Econ, Adriene and Jacob investigate just why some economies are more productive than others, and what happens when an economy is mor productive. We'll look at how things like per capita GDP translate to the lifestyle of normal people. And, there's a mystery. Crash Course is on Patreon! You can support us directly by signing up at http://www.patreon.com/crashcourse Thanks to the following Patrons for their generous monthly contributions that help keep Crash Course free for everyone forever: Mark, Jan Schmid, Simun Niclasen, Robert Kunz, Daniel Baulig, Jason A Saslow, Eric Kitchen, Christian, Beatrice Jin, Anna-Ester Volozh, Eric Knight, Elliot Beter, Jeffrey Thompson, Ian Dundore, Stephen Lawless, Today I Found Out, James Craver, Jessica Wode, Sandra Aft, Jacob Ash, SR Foxley, Christy Huddleston, Steve Marshall, Chris Peters Want to find Crash Course elsewhere on the internet? Facebook - http://www.facebook.com/YouTubeCrashCourse Twitter - http://www.twitter.com/TheCrashCourse Tumblr - http://thecrashcourse.tumblr.com Support Crash Course on Patreon: http://patreon.com/crashcourse CC Kids: http://www.youtube.com/crashcoursekids
https://wn.com/Productivity_And_Growth_Crash_Course_Economics_6
Outlook of developed economies

Outlook of developed economies

  • Order:
  • Duration: 1:25
  • Updated: 05 Sep 2015
  • views: 533
videos
Head of Investment from Nomura Asset Management Malaysia, Leslie Yap expects developed economies to grow.
https://wn.com/Outlook_Of_Developed_Economies
Full Potential Refining in Developed Economies

Full Potential Refining in Developed Economies

  • Order:
  • Duration: 3:59
  • Updated: 27 Oct 2016
  • views: 134
videos
Pedro Caruso, a partner in the Oil & Gas practice, offers a structured plan that can help refiners overcome compressed margins and eventually reap the benefits of the industry's structural shift. Read the Bain Brief: http://www.bain.com/publications/articles/full-potential-oil-refining-in-a-challenging-environment.aspx More on Pedro Caruso: http://www.bain.com/about/people-and-values/our-team/profiles/pedro-caruso.aspx
https://wn.com/Full_Potential_Refining_In_Developed_Economies
Puzzle of Growth: Rich Countries and Poor Countries

Puzzle of Growth: Rich Countries and Poor Countries

  • Order:
  • Duration: 8:33
  • Updated: 16 Feb 2016
  • views: 19769
videos
Throughout this section of the course, we’ve been trying to solve a complicated economic puzzle—why are some countries rich and others poor? There are various factors at play, interacting in a dynamic, and changing environment. And the final answer to the puzzle differs depending on the perspective you're looking from. In this video, you'll examine different pieces of the wealth puzzle, and learn about how they fit. The first piece of the puzzle, is about productivity. You'll learn how physical capital, human capital, technological knowledge, and entrepreneurs all fit together to spur higher productivity in a population. From this perspective, you'll see economic growth as a function of a country's factors of production. You’ll also learn what investments can be made to improve and increase these production factors. Still, even that is too simplistic to explain everything. So we'll also introduce you to another piece of the puzzle: incentives. In previous videos, you learned about the incentives presented by different economic, cultural, and political models. In this video, we'll stay on that track, showing how different incentives produce different results. As an example, you'll learn why something as simple as agriculture isn't nearly so simple at all. We'll put you in the shoes of a hypothetical farmer, for a bit. In those shoes, you'll see how incentives can mean the difference between getting to keep a whole bag of potatoes from your farm, or just a hundredth of a bag from a collective farm. (Trust us, the potatoes explain a lot.) Potatoes aside, you're also going to see how different incentives shaped China's economic landscape during the “Great Leap Forward” of the 1950s and 60s. With incentives as a lens, you'll see why China's supposed leap forward ended in starvation for tens of millions. Hold on—incentives still aren’t the end of it. After all, incentives have to come from somewhere. That “somewhere” is institutions. As we showed you before, institutions dictate incentives. Things like property rights, cultural norms, honest governments, dependable laws, and political stability, all create incentives of different kinds. Remember our hypothetical farmer? Through that farmer, you'll learn how different institutions affect all of us. You'll see how institutions help dictate how hard a person works, and how likely he or she is to invest in the economy, beyond that work. Then, once you understand the full effect of institutions, you'll go beyond that, to the final piece of the wealth puzzle. And it's the most mysterious piece, too. Why? Because the final piece of the puzzle is the amorphous combination of a country’s history, ideas, culture, geography, and even a little luck. These things aren't as direct as the previous pieces, but they matter all the same. You'll see why the US constitution is the way it is, and you'll learn about people like Adam Smith and John Locke, whose ideas helped inform it. And if all this talk of pieces makes you think that the wealth puzzle is a complex one, you’d be right. Because the truth is, the question of “what creates wealth?” really is complex. Even the puzzle pieces you'll learn about don't constitute every variable at play. And as we mentioned earlier, not only are the factors complex, but they're also constantly changing as they bump against each other. Luckily, while the quest to finish the wealth puzzle isn’t over, at least we have some of the pieces in hand. So take the time to dive in and listen to this video and let us know if you have questions along the way. After that, we'll soon head into a new section of the course: we’ll tackle the factors of production so we can further explore what leads to economic growth. Macroeconomics Course: http://bit.ly/1R1PL5x Ask a question about the video: http://bit.ly/1QEPrQ3 Next video: http://bit.ly/1WJe2Bw Help us caption & translate this video! http://amara.org/v/HrHZ/
https://wn.com/Puzzle_Of_Growth_Rich_Countries_And_Poor_Countries
Why Some Countries Are Poor and Others Rich

Why Some Countries Are Poor and Others Rich

  • Order:
  • Duration: 8:48
  • Updated: 24 Nov 2014
  • views: 2765356
videos
The reason why some countries are rich and others poor depends on many things, including the quality of their institutions, the culture they have, the natural resources they find and what latitude they're on. If you like our films, take a look at our shop (we ship worldwide): https://goo.gl/dXpOl4 We have, unusually, had to disable comments because of the number of people writing to tell us that we have forgotten about colonialism. We are very aware of colonialism but didn't, on this occasion, give this factor a central role. FURTHER READING You can read more on CAPITALISM, SELF, RELATIONSHIPS and many other topics on our blog TheBookofLife.org at this link: https://goo.gl/IG0HRZ MORE SCHOOL OF LIFE Our website has classes, articles and products to help you think and grow: https://goo.gl/dKEM4i Watch more films on CAPITALISM in our playlist: http://bit.ly/2dmGWsp Do you speak a different language to English? Did you know you can submit Subtitles on all of our videos on YouTube? For instructions how to do this click here: https://goo.gl/H8FZVQ SOCIAL MEDIA Feel free to follow us at the links below: Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/theschooloflifelondon/ Twitter: https://twitter.com/TheSchoolOfLife Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/theschooloflifelondon/ CREDITS Produced in collaboration with: Vale Productions http://www.valeproductions.co.uk Music by Kevin MacLeod http://www.incompetech.com
https://wn.com/Why_Some_Countries_Are_Poor_And_Others_Rich
Dambisa Moyo: Is China the new idol for emerging economies?

Dambisa Moyo: Is China the new idol for emerging economies?

  • Order:
  • Duration: 16:24
  • Updated: 11 Nov 2013
  • views: 207045
videos
The developed world holds up the ideals of capitalism, democracy and political rights for all. Those in emerging markets often don't have that luxury. In this powerful talk, economist Dambisa Moyo makes the case that the west can't afford to rest on its laurels and imagine others will blindly follow. Instead, a different model, embodied by China, is increasingly appealing. A call for open-minded political and economic cooperation in the name of transforming the world. TEDTalks is a daily video podcast of the best talks and performances from the TED Conference, where the world's leading thinkers and doers give the talk of their lives in 18 minutes (or less). Look for talks on Technology, Entertainment and Design -- plus science, business, global issues, the arts and much more. Find closed captions and translated subtitles in many languages at http://www.ted.com/translate Follow TED news on Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/tednews Like TED on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/TED Subscribe to our channel: http://www.youtube.com/user/TEDtalksDirector
https://wn.com/Dambisa_Moyo_Is_China_The_New_Idol_For_Emerging_Economies
How China became the world's second largest economy

How China became the world's second largest economy

  • Order:
  • Duration: 1:25
  • Updated: 06 Oct 2015
  • views: 6619
videos
More than 500 million people have been lifted out of poverty since China's economic reforms began in 1978.
https://wn.com/How_China_Became_The_World's_Second_Largest_Economy
WESP 2013   Regional Economic Outlook  Developed Economies

WESP 2013 Regional Economic Outlook Developed Economies

  • Order:
  • Duration: 2:11
  • Updated: 17 Jan 2013
  • views: 1
videos
Хотите выгодно инвестировать деньги? Тогда заходите на мой блог: http://invest-system-thuong.blogspot.com/
https://wn.com/Wesp_2013_Regional_Economic_Outlook_Developed_Economies
Developed Countries VS. Developing Countries

Developed Countries VS. Developing Countries

  • Order:
  • Duration: 4:08
  • Updated: 08 Apr 2014
  • views: 16936
videos
None-- Created using PowToon -- Free sign up at http://www.powtoon.com/ . Make your own animated videos and animated presentations for free. PowToon is a free tool that allows you to develop cool animated clips and animated presentations for your website, office meeting, sales pitch, nonprofit fundraiser, product launch, video resume, or anything else you could use an animated explainer video. PowToon's animation templates help you create animated presentations and animated explainer videos from scratch. Anyone can produce awesome animations quickly with PowToon, without the cost or hassle other professional animation services require.
https://wn.com/Developed_Countries_Vs._Developing_Countries
Largest Economies in the World 2016 GDP (PPP) | IMF

Largest Economies in the World 2016 GDP (PPP) | IMF

  • Order:
  • Duration: 8:59
  • Updated: 08 May 2015
  • views: 254334
videos
Top 15 countries by GDP PPP in the world.
https://wn.com/Largest_Economies_In_The_World_2016_Gdp_(Ppp)_|_Imf
Economic Development Series:  Common Characteristics of Developing Countries

Economic Development Series: Common Characteristics of Developing Countries

  • Order:
  • Duration: 9:46
  • Updated: 21 Feb 2016
  • views: 1524
videos
Hey Everyone, This is video 4 of 6 videos in “The Economic Development Series”. Watch the entire series right here: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLNI2Up0JUWkEhlr-c4dpa1xqQf-Sq2BXv The List! Here is the “The List” for “The Economic Development Series”: For an explanation of the logic of “The Lists” click here: https://youtu.be/dE0fbsgXlFE What is economic development? Sources of economic growth 1. Natural factors 2. Human capital factors 3. Physical capital and technological factors 4. Institutional factors Does economic growth lead to economic development? 1. Higher incomes 2. Improved economic indicators of welfare 3. Higher government revenues 4. Creation of inequality 5. Negative externalities and lack of sustainability Common characteristics of developing countries 1. Low standard of living, low incomes, inequality, poor health, and inadequate education 2. Low levels of productivity 3. High rates of population growth and dependency burdens (child and old age ratios) 4. High and rising levels of unemployment and underemployment 5. Substantial dependence on agricultural production and primary market exports 6. Prevalence of imperfect markets and limited information 7. Dominance, dependence, and vulnerability in international relations Diversity among developing nations 1. Resource endowment 2. Historical background 3. Geographic and demographic factors 4. Ethnic and religious breakdown 5. The structure of industry 6. Per capita income levels 7. Political structure International development goals 1. Goal 1: Eradicate extreme poverty and hunger 2. Goal 2: Achieve universal primary education 3. Goal 3: Promote gender equality and empower women 4. Goal 4: Reduce child mortality 5. Goal 5: Improve maternal health 6. Goal 6: Combat HIV/AIDS, malaria, and other diseases 7. Goal 7: Ensure environmental sustainability 8. Goal 8: Develop a Global Partnership for Development I hope you find these videos helpful to your study of Economics. Enjoy! Brad Cartwright
https://wn.com/Economic_Development_Series_Common_Characteristics_Of_Developing_Countries
Developed Economies Still Matter

Developed Economies Still Matter

  • Order:
  • Duration: 2:00
  • Updated: 13 Aug 2013
  • views: 87
videos
With the world's focus on emerging economies, it's easy to think developed economies offer no growth potential for businesses. In this video, Sarah Boumphrey, Head of Countries of Consumers Research at Euromonitor International, discusses the advantages developed economies hold over emerging economies, including friendlier business environments, less corruption and higher penetration of technology.
https://wn.com/Developed_Economies_Still_Matter
Why Singapore became an economic success

Why Singapore became an economic success

  • Order:
  • Duration: 2:13
  • Updated: 26 Mar 2015
  • views: 90366
videos
When it started life as an independent, separate country in 1965, Singapore’s prospects did not look good. Tiny and underdeveloped, it had no natural resources and a population of relatively recent immigrants with little shared history. The country’s first prime minister, the late Lee Kuan Yew is credited with transforming it. He called one volume of his memoirs, “From Third World to First”. Why did Singapore become an economic success? First, its strategic location and natural harbour helped. It is at the mouth of the Malacca Strait, through which perhaps 40% of world maritime trade passes. It was an important trading post in the 14th century, and again from the 19th, when British diplomat Sir Stamford Raffles founded the modern city. Now it is at the heart of one of the world’s most dynamic regions. Under Mr Lee, Singapore made the most of these advantages. Second, under Mr Lee, Singapore welcomed foreign trade and investment. Multinationals found Singapore a natural hub and were encouraged to expand and prosper. Third, the government was kept small, efficient and honest—qualities absent in most of Singapore’s neighbours. It regularly tops surveys for the ease of doing business. But the island city is not ideal. Although clean and orderly, it has harsh judicial punishments, a tame press and illiberal social policies. Homosexual acts, for example, remain illegal. Protest demonstrations are rarely permitted. Mr Lee saw his authoritarian style of government as an essential ingredient in Singapore’s success, emphasizing the island’s vulnerability in a potentially hostile neighbourhood. But younger people now question whether Singapore really is that fragile, and resent the restrictions on their freedom.
https://wn.com/Why_Singapore_Became_An_Economic_Success
Carbon Sequestration in Developed Economies

Carbon Sequestration in Developed Economies

  • Order:
  • Duration: 1:11
  • Updated: 14 Oct 2016
  • views: 13
videos
How can CO2 be captured?
https://wn.com/Carbon_Sequestration_In_Developed_Economies
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